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Arizona Information and Facts

"Arizona State Travel and Visitor Information."

Arizona Information



Official Website: http://www.az.gov/

Income

The population of Arizona in 2002 was 5,441,125. Its rank was 19th in the nation. (The District of Columbia is included for ranking purposes.)

Per Capita Personal Income

In 2002 Arizona had a per capita personal income of $26,360. This per capita personal income ranked 39th in the United States and was 85 percent of the national average, $30,906. The 2002 per capita personal income reflected an increase of 1.2 percent from 2001. The 2001-2002 national change was 1.2 percent. In 1992 the per capita personal income of Arizona was $17,777 and ranked 38th in the United States. The 1992-2002 average annual growth rate of per capita personal income was 4.0 percent. The average annual growth rate for the nation was 4.0 percent.

Total Personal Income

In 2002 Arizona had a total personal income of $143,428,757. This total personal income ranked 23rd in the United States. In 1992 the total personal income of Arizona was $69,608,941 and ranked 25th in the United States. The 2002 total personal income reflected an increase of 3.9 percent from 2001. The 2001-2002 national change was 2.3 percent. The 1992-2002 average annual growth rate of total personal income was 7.5 percent. The average annual growth rate for the nation was 5.2 percent.

Components of Personal Income

Total personal income includes net earnings by place of residence; dividends, interest, and rent; and total personal current transfer receipts received by the residents of Arizona. In 2002 net earnings accounted for 67.0 percent of total personal income (compared with 64.1 in 1992); dividends, interest, and rent were 17.8 percent (compared with 20.6 in 1992); and personal current transfer receipts were 15.1 percent (compared with 15.4 in 1992). From 2001 to 2002 net earnings increased 2.9 percent; dividends, interest, and rent increased 1.5 percent; and personal current transfer receipts increased 12.1 percent. From 1992 to 2002 net earnings increased on average 8.0 percent each year; dividends, interest, and rent increased on average 6.0 percent; and personal current transfer receipts increased on average 7.3 percent.

Employment Earnings

Earnings of persons employed in Arizona increased from $104,296,510 in 2001 to $107,396,983 in 2002, an increase of 3.0 percent. The 2001-2002 national change was 1.5 percent. The average annual growth rate from the 1992 estimate of $50,190,326 to the 2002 estimate was 7.9 percent. The average annual growth rate for the nation was 5.3 percent.


Area - Arizona ranks sixth among the states in size. With an area of 295,274 sq km (114,006 sq mi), including 943 sq km (364 sq mi) of inland water, it is almost as large as all of the New England states and New York combined. Arizona's mean elevation is about 1250 m (about 4100 ft). Roughly rectangular in shape, the state's extreme dimensions are 631 km (392 mi) from north to south and 549 km (341 mi) from east to west. Most of the western border is formed by the Colorado River. The northeastern corner is the only place where four states meet: Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, and Utah.

Climate - Arizona's healthful climate, with clear and sunny skies and dry weather, is one of the state's chief assets. It not only attracts tourists but is often a delight to residents, especially those suffering from asthma and other respiratory complaints who find relief from dry air. But as in most developed areas, Arizona's pristine air is threatened by pollution brought on by residential and industrial development. However, the sunny, clear climate permits such activities as building houses and grazing cattle year round. It has also been an important factor in the location of space observatories and aircraft and missile proving grounds in the state. Because of the variety of Arizona's topography, precipitation varies greatly between locations. Air masses from the Gulf of Mexico and Gulf of California release moisture while rising over the southeastern mountains, creating a rain shadow on the lee side. These ranges, and the Mogollon Rim for the same reason, receive the most precipitation in the state, amounting to about 760 mm (about 30 in) annually. Thunderstorms are common occurrences during the summer, although mountain summits are often the only places that receive the moisture because the rain evaporates in the hot, dry air of the valleys and plateaus before striking the ground. Other regions in Arizona's semiarid desert areas-about one-half of the state-average less than 250 mm (10 in) of rain annually. Deserts in the southwest average even less, receiving from 50 to 130 mm (2 to 5 in) annually. The hottest, driest, and sunniest part of Arizona is in the Basin and Range region of the west and southwest. Average July daytime temperatures in this desert region are in the mid-30s C (mid-90s F), although maximum temperatures have been known to soar into the lower 50s C (mid-120s F). Summer nights are usually in the 20s to low 30s C (70s to 80s). Winters are mild, with daytime temperatures rising to the upper 10s C (upper 60s F) and at night staying above freezing, though occasional light frosts occur in the Basin and Range region. The growing season is long, ranging from 240 days over much of the area to more than 320 days at Yuma, which is in the center of an irrigated farming area. The climate of the high Colorado Plateau is quite different from that of the Basin and Range region, with cold winters and generally cool summers. Although arid or semiarid, the plateau receives between 130 and 250 mm (5 and 10 in) of annual precipitation, partly in the form of snow. Snow can accumulate to 2500 mm (100 in) in a single season. Winter in the plateau brings temperatures well below freezing, and frigid winds sweep through the northern forests. Summer days are generally warm and sunny, with temperatures in the mid-20s to lower 30s C (80s F), dropping at night to below 10 C (50s F). However, in the canyons it is as hot as in the desert. The growing season is less than 120 days on the high plateau. Elevation is a major factor in weather on the Colorado Plateau. For example, the south rim of the Grand Canyon has a milder winter and is open to visitors all year, while the north rim is snowbound from November to May. While only a relatively short distance apart, the north rim is 300 to 600 m (1000 to 2000 ft) higher in elevation.

Arizona State Flag
State Flag
Arizona State Flower
State Flower - Saguaro Cactus Blossom


State Capitol - Phoenix
Arizona adheres to its original constitution adopted in 1911, although amendments and interpretations by courts have dramatically changed its original substance. An amendment to the constitution may be proposed by the legislature, by a voters' initiative, or by a constitutional convention. To be ratified, a proposed amendment must be approved by a majority of the people voting on the issue in an election.

Famous People

Apache Kid Indian outlaw, Arizona Territory
Barry Goldwater politician, Phoenix
Carl Trumbull Hayden politician, Phoenix
Cesar Estrada Chavez labor leader, Yuma
Charles Mingus jazz musician and composer, Nogales
Cochise Apache Indian chief, Arizona Territory
Frank Luke, Jr. WWI fighter ace, Phoenix
Geronimo Apache Indian chief, Arizona Territory
Kerri Strug gymnast, Tucson
Linda Ronstadt singer, Tucson
Louie Espinoza Arizona's first world champion boxer, Chandler
Lynda Carter actress, Phoenix
Michael Carbajal world champion boxer, Phoenix
Rex Allen singer, actor, Willcox
Stewart Udall former Secretary of the Interior, Saint Johns

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