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North Dakota Information and Facts

"North Dakota State Travel and Visitor Information."

North Dakota Information



Official Website: http://www.discovernd.com/

Income

The population of North Dakota in 2002 was 633,911. Its rank was 48th in the nation. (The District of Columbia is included for ranking purposes.)

Per Capita Personal Income

In 2002 North Dakota had a per capita personal income of $26,852. This per capita personal income ranked 38th in the United States and was 87 percent of the national average, $30,906. The 2002 per capita personal income reflected an increase of 4.0 percent from 2001. The 2001-2002 national change was 1.2 percent. In 1992 the per capita personal income of North Dakota was $17,669 and ranked 39th in the United States. The 1992-2002 average annual growth rate of per capita personal income was 4.3 percent. The average annual growth rate for the nation was 4.0 percent.

Total Personal Income

In 2002 North Dakota had a total personal income of $17,021,618. This total personal income ranked 50th in the United States. In 1992 the total personal income of North Dakota was $11,276,841 and ranked 49th in the United States. The 2002 total personal income reflected an increase of 3.6 percent from 2001. The 2001-2002 national change was 2.3 percent. The 1992-2002 average annual growth rate of total personal income was 4.2 percent. The average annual growth rate for the nation was 5.2 percent.

Components of Personal Income

Total personal income includes net earnings by place of residence; dividends, interest, and rent; and total personal current transfer receipts received by the residents of North Dakota. In 2002 net earnings accounted for 64.5 percent of total personal income (compared with 64.8 in 1992); dividends, interest, and rent were 19.5 percent (compared with 19.6 in 1992); and personal current transfer receipts were 16.0 percent (compared with 15.6 in 1992). From 2001 to 2002 net earnings increased 3.7 percent; dividends, interest, and rent increased 0.6 percent; and personal current transfer receipts increased 7.0 percent. From 1992 to 2002 net earnings increased on average 4.2 percent each year; dividends, interest, and rent increased on average 4.1 percent; and personal current transfer receipts increased on average 4.4 percent.

Employment Earnings

Earnings of persons employed in North Dakota increased from $12,603,307 in 2001 to $13,096,560 in 2002, an increase of 3.9 percent. The 2001-2002 national change was 1.5 percent. The average annual growth rate from the 1992 estimate of $8,570,182 to the 2002 estimate was 4.3 percent. The average annual growth rate for the nation was 5.3 percent.

Area - Located at the geographical center of the North American continent, North Dakota is bounded on the north by the 49th parallel, which separates it from the Canadian provinces of Manitoba and Saskatchewan. Its eastern boundary, the only natural boundary of the state, consists of the Red River of the North, or Red River, and one of its headwater streams, the Bois de Sioux River. North Dakota's boundaries enclose a rectangular area of 183,123 sq km (70,704 sq mi), including 4429 sq km (1710 sq mi) of inland water, making it the 18th largest state in the nation. From north to south its maximum distance is 341 km (212 mi), and from east to west, North Dakota extends for 581 km (361 mi). The state slopes downward from southwest to northeast. The lowest point, 229 m (750 ft) above sea level, is found at the Red River near Pembina, in the northeastern corner of the state. The state's highest point, 1069 m (3506 ft), is White Butte, in southwestern North Dakota. The mean elevation of the state is about 580 m (1900 ft). North Dakota is a Plains state. Although it is largely flat or rolling, there are rough and hilly sections. In relatively recent geologic time a continental glacier spread over all but the southwestern section. It brought soil from Canada, scoured down the highlands, and filled in the lowlands. The glacier blocked the northward-flowing Red River, forming the glacial Lake Agassiz, whose dry lake basin forms the flat and fertile Red River valley in the east.

Climate - North Dakota has hot summers and long cold winters. Its maximum precipitation falls in spring and early summer. Weather conditions, including temperature, can change rapidly. Mean temperatures in Bismarck, near the center of the state, are representative of those of most parts of the state. January, the coldest month, has an average temperature of -13 C (9 F), and July, the warmest month, averages 21 C (70 F). Extremes of 49 C (121 F) and -51 C (-60 F) have been recorded. At Bismarck, the growing season averages 134 days, as the average date of the last killing frost is May 11 and that of the first killing frost is September 22. The length of the growing season drops to about 110 days in the northerly reaches of the state. The long periods of summer sunshine at this latitude, providing as much as 16 hours of daylight in summer, help crops to mature quickly, thus compensating somewhat for the relatively short growing season. Temperatures in the north are, on the average, several degrees lower than those in the south. Some of the greatest variations are from west to east. The west is affected by Chinook winds while the east is not. Average January temperatures range from -10 C (14 F) in the west to -16 C (3 F) in the east. The range for precipitation is also greater from east to west. Precipitation ranges from about 510 mm (about 20 in) in the east to about 360 mm (about 14 in) in the west. Snowfall is relatively light, although low temperatures keep the snow from melting and strong winter winds can cause enormous snowdrifts. Most of the precipitation falls during the growing season and therefore benefits farming. The precipitation averages are about the minimum needed for farming, and at times dry years have caused crop disasters.

North Dakota State Flag
State Flag
North Dakota State Flower
State Flower - Wild Prairie Rose


State Capitol - Bismark
North Dakota is governed under its original constitution, adopted in 1889, as amended. A constitutional amendment may be proposed by the state legislature or by an initiative. To become effective, it must be approved by a majority of voters in a general election.

Famous People

Angie Dickinson actress, Kulm
Ann Sothern actress, Valley City
Arthur Peterson radio and TV actor
Casper Oimoen skier
Cliff Fido Purpur hockey player, coach
Dorothy Stickney actress Dickinson
Dr. Anne Carlsen educator
Dr. Leon O. Jacobson researcher, educator, Sims
Dr. Robert H. Bahmer U.S. archivist
Edward K. Thompson editor
Elizabeth Bodine humanitarian
Era Bell Thompson editor
Eric Sevareid TV commentator, Velva
Harold K. Johnson army general
Ivan Dmitre artist
James Rosenquist painter, Grand Forks
John Bernard Flannagan sculptor, Fargo
Larry Woiwode writer
Lawrence Welk band leader, entertainer, Strasburg
Louis L'Amour author, Jamestown
Marquis de Mores cattleman
Peggy Lee singer, Jamestown
Phil D. Jackson basketball player, coach
Phyllis Frelich actress, Devils Lake
Rev. Richard C. Halverson U.S. Senate chaplain
Ronald N. Davies jurist
Tommy Tucker band leader, Souris
William H. Gass writer and philosopher, Fargo

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